Items of Interest

Kirkos Body Noise Work

This week I had the pleasure of photographing the Body Noise Work event organised by Kirkos Ensemble in The Temple Bar Gallery and Studios in Dublin. The multi-disciplinary night combined art, music and performance art across four floors and featured an abseiling bath and kombucha among many other amazing performances. You can read a review of the event by The Journal of Music here. You can check out the photos I took of the event here.

Podcasts Of The Week: The Blindboy Podcast - Bernadette Devlin McAliskey

I'm working my way through past episodes of The Blindboy Podcast and this week I listened to his live interview with Bernadette Devlin McAliskey. The episode starts with an emotional preamble where Blinboy describes how an incident while out running brought him face to face with the shortness of life. That story in itself would have been enough to go away with and ponder on, but what followed was an amazing live interview with Bernadette Devlin McAliskey.

From Limerick

Last on the music video list this week is From Limerick, a tribute to Delores. Limerick Self Storage released this great video by Shane Serrano of The Cranberries song When You're Gone covered by a range of artists from Limerick, in aid of the Mid West Simon Community.

Softday Uisce Salach

Art-Science duo Softday have launched a new community art project called Uisce Salach (Dirty Water) based on water analyses from domestic water supplies from the River Liffey, its tributaries in Dublin City and from Dublin Port. The project will synergise science and arts practice using water sampling and creative technology, developing new thinking and new meaning around the sustainability of water resources.

Plant Power

Researchers at the Centre for Micro-Bio Robotics of IIT in Pontedera in Italy have discovered that certain plants generate electricity when touched that can power up to 100 LEDs (150V) per leaf. The leaves gather electric charges on their surface as a result of contact electrification and transmit the current directly to the stem of the plant, which can then be harvested. the researchers built a hybrid Nerum oleander tree with artificial leaves that touch the natural leaves and generate electricity.

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